Aug
16
6:30pm 6:30pm

Quantum Words on Architectonic Objects (Call for Contributions due to Sept. 16th)

Quantum Words on Architectonic Objects

Quantum. The unit of emitted energy. Circulating and translating between all things tangible and graspable. Quantum Words on Architectonic Objects are diligent articulations of ordinary things. They are distinctive for the architect ́s ability to offer a richness of detail and insight within no less than five hundred and no more than a thousand words of print. Short enough to be read while drinking an espresso and significant enough to delight the reader with the accepted diversion.

***
First in a series:

The Table in the light of Quantity and the Precious.

Invitation to short contributions on: 

THE TABLE
500-1000 words,
English or German
Delivery September 16th 2017

mail to: vera.buehlmann[at]attp.tuwien.ac.at

***

edited by
Vera Bühlmann, Emmanuelle Chiappone-Piriou, Georg Fassl,
ATTP Technische Universität Wien August 2017

***

Architectonic Objects Digital Weather Conditions

Digital Fabrication, Smart Cities, the Internet of Things, Big Data, Rationalisation and the Digital Production Chain, Semantic and Object-Oriented Ontologies, Automated Process Design, and Parametrism as the "New International Style": Increasingly so, everything gets connected with everything else in a global kind of intellectual and entropic climate. The temporal currents brings us but modulations of the past. Intellectual tempests are cooking up here and there. Architectural ideas pour like rain from ideational cluster-clouds. Information floods are washing away the shores of long cultivated fields. Fresh breezes are local, recurrent, often they are pleasantly mild.

A building is what withstands the weather. The Quantum Words on Architectonic Objects series wants to cultivate the architectural object amidst this plenty of climatic influences. It reaches out to architects (and other intellectuals) in order to learn articulating what is precious about architecture.

Our Theorem:

What is an architectonic object? An architectonic object is an ordinary object, one we find exposed from what it may once have been conceived as. It may not have lost its mystical appeal altogether, but we have long learned to live with it – to live with it well, and this without fully comprehending it. The architectonic object is an object whose parts are elementary but mobile, whose components are modular yet can be measured (not only calculated), whose balances are asymmetrical and yet producing stability. 

***

First in a Series of Architectonic Objects: The Table

The first Architectonic Object we would like to articulate in Quantum Words is that of The Table.

We sit at tables for having diner or breakfast. A table is the sine qua non of every banquet. It stands on four feet and levels a plane in between. A table erects a stable board in distance to the ground. Empty, the table provides the iconic site of modern, experimental methods of investigation. When organised into rows and columns a table provides the iconic site of keeping records, collecting data, organising knowledge. It feeds tax agents just as much as computers. The Round Table lives forth, from King Arthur ́s time onwards, as the iconic site for reconciliation. It is well known to facilitate a flat hierarchy among noble men. In the Symposium, the table manifests the fondness for mixing wine and intellectual discussion.

What open secrets, what precious stories, can we unlock from the role this architectonic object plays in the different architectural disciplines today? How are tables used in Structural Design? In Digital Architecture? In Building Physics? In Social Housing? In City Planning? in Baukunst? In Building Conservation? In Baroque Architecture? In Le Corbusier ́s machines-for-living-in? What does the table, as an architectonic object, afford in the different disciplines? what does it present, what does it exclude, what does it organise, what does it provide, what does it demand, what does it conserve? 

***

On the Quantum Words Series

Motto
English: The Very Many and the Big Plenty: Quantity and the Precious
German: Das Sehr Viele und das Grosse Reichliche: Quantität und das Kostbare

How could "the many" possibly be "intensified"? How could something that is abundantly full be measured? How can we rationalise what is not determinably finite and scarce? what could possibly be the unit of such measurement, and even worse, how on earth should we think of the reference magnitude for such a unit? Linguistically speaking, we have here (with The Very Many and the Big Plenty) an intensive qualifier for the many, a measuring adjective for the abundantly full – is this not a sheer mess of category mistakes, a kind of a logical disaster? For any (classically) logical idea of objects, speaking of The Very Many and The Big Plenty certainly is not a phrasing that makes much sense.

Logical Statements (Definition and Order)

That ́s because logics is committed to an understanding of the static that is rooted in a notion of order. Logics deals with statements relative to either cosmical, metaphysical, ontological, or mathematical order. Motion and rest must exclude one another in the states that are at stake in logics, and the same goes for any other pair of, in a logical sense, contradictory notions. Our phrasings, in their paradoxical set ups, could hence not play a legitimate role in any logical argument.

Rhetorical Stasis (Consensus and Order)

Different from logics, rhetorics knew a term that specifically designates set-ups whose starting positions appear to be in contradiction with each other: If two opponents, for a combat in sophistication, enter debate with two competing lines of argumentation, what has to be established first is a middle ground between them. This, in rhetorics, is called Stasis. Stasis literally means a standing still. It designated a state of stability, in which all forces are equal and opposing, and therefore cancel each other out.

Including the Operations of a General Equivalent (Algebra and Money)

How exactly such rhetorical stasis is different from the kind of stasis at stake in logics, this is a large and unsettled issues of which we can perhaps say that it is transversal to philosophy at large. After all, is a notion of order not characterised in the same manner, as a state of stability in which all forces are equal and opposing, and therefore cancelling each other out? is this not why, from understanding the order of things, we can learn to manipulate them? Marcel Hénaff, the anthropologist, has recently caught up with the history of this conflict in his beautiful book entitled The Price of Truth (2003). This is why we aim at linking up with the interplay between quality and quantity.

Statues: Set Up to Keep Something Present

There is another context in which phrases of the kind we are dealing with here might be approached. We might conceive of the paradoxical topic the try to capture best as a kind of statue, literally the set up of something to be kept present, to be remembered, from stature, "to cause to stand, set up."

If such set ups were not logically consistent, so the Ancient Greeks knew already, they will not be capable of maintaining themselves. The stability they put forward, hence, would not be a stability at all: it is bound to corrupt, to degenerate, to become something unstable, something that is capable of decay. Such statues could still appear as beautiful though. Just like poetic verse could appear as beautiful. The Ancient Greeks had a word for this kind of beauty, they called those statues daedalus. Not because the mythical figure of Daedalus, the first architect purported by legend, would alone have been believed as capable of crafting them. But because the legendary first architect was the first to build statues from parts that were modular and mobile: Daedalus was the first to build mechanical statues, statues capable of transporting a certain condition from one situation to another, where the same condition appears, at first, as ill fitted, if not entirely out of place. Mechanics was considered as an art, in the sense that it required the kind of cunning that would translate, literally carry across or bridge, odd situations like Minos ́ wife wishing to mate with the bull that Minos, the king of Crete, had kept from Zeus by cheating on him.

Mechanics and Art, Nature and Culture

In mechanics, indeed, rest and motion need not exclude one another – quite the opposite. They are treated by the mechanic in a way that knows how to keep the balances between them in a variety of manners. The mechanic was he who knew how to distribute the weights between the sides of the scale such as to yield a certain effect repeatedly, objectively, intended and yet completely independent from his subjective will. Is the top of a spinning circle at rest or is it rotating? Problems like these are often treated by the first scientists. Mathematically, they could be rigorously described (by Archimedes for example, who remained one of the most inspiring influences for architects and artists alike throughout the centuries). But logically, they remained problematic. We have here, perhaps, the very theme that underlies the distinction between things artificial and things natural. 

Architectonic Objects: The Whole Picture and The Mobile Partition

With our Quantum Words on Architectonic Objects we want to leave unresolved these philosophical disputes between what we could call The Whole Picture (logical order) and The Mobile Partition (mechanical order, rhetorical stasis, or crafted statues). We want to treat them in the Quantum Way: we seek to acknowledge that there must be a way to accommodate both perspectives, in like manner as in quantum physics, where we can measure the speed of a particle as well as its location, but not both at once.

How could we go about such measurement in architecture? Via objects. We cannot do so without a form of mediacy. Like the mobile statues once called daedalus, objects of the most ordinary kind are caught up in a contradictory activity too: the pot contains but also excludes. A floor supports but also lifts up from the ground. A roof covers but also exposes a structure to the weather. A wall separates rooms but also connects them.

Remembering ordinary objects in terms of their double facedness, we want to address them as Architectonic Objects: object whose parts are elementary but mobile, whose components are modular yet can be measured, whose balances are asymmetrical yet producing stability. An architectonic object is an ordinary object, one which may not have lost its mystical appeal altogether but which can be accounted for quantitatively. 

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Aug
16
6:00pm 6:00pm

Upcoming: 4th Workshop on DIGITAL GNOMONICS (Sept. 10-17)

Athens, Greece, September 10-17th 2017

With these workshops we want to engage with the vibrant and intriguing questions of architecture in the world of data. During these weeks of intensive exchange, we will immerse ourselves into abstract thinking, coding as literacy, and digital citizenship in architecture. Do you think that digital architecture has reached a point of saturation? Are you interested in stepping beyond the current discourses around digitality today? We believe that digital technologies, behaviours and environments have a far greater potential than their current articulations suggest. Let us think of coding as a new literacy!

The course is aimed at creative open-minded people who would like to challenge traditional architectural education. Current students, bachelors, masters and PhDs, recent graduates, architects, designers, career changers and individuals interested in technology and culture at large are all welcome. The course requires no specialised knowledge or background beyond a serious interest in the topic. 

Get in touch if you are interested!

Co-organized by:

Ludger Hovestadt, architect and computer scientist, professor for CAAD at ETH Zurich.
Vera Bühlmann, philosopher and media theorist, professor for architectural theory at TU Vienna.
Elias Zafiris, quantum physicist and mathematician, professor at Eötvös University, Budapest.

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Just OUT: A Genius Planet (Birkhäuser, Basel 2017)
Aug
16
5:30pm 5:30pm

Just OUT: A Genius Planet (Birkhäuser, Basel 2017)

A GENIUS PLANET — ENERGY: FROM SCARCITY TO ABUNDANCE, A RADICAL PATHWAY

BY LUDGER HOVESTADT, VERA BÜHLMANN, SEBASTIAN MICHAEL (Birkhäuser, Basel 2017)

https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/466971

Imagine a world where the power is always on, where there is not just enough energy, but an abundance of it. Such a world is no Utopia, it is a possible reality. Using indefinitely available sources of energy – especially photovoltaic solar, in combination with others – and networking this energy, much in the way that we have networked information, we can get beyond our current energy ‘crisis’ and resolve it. The world we then find ourselves in is not a world without problems – we will face new challenges on the way – but in terms of energy it is a world of plenty. Rooted in sound theory and based on technology that is available now, A Genius Planet offers an accessible but detailed and insightful perspective on how we can free ourselves from our dependency on natural resources and generate, trade, and use energy in ways that open up the genuine potential that we have at our disposal today.

From the Foreword:

"This book has a simple and optimistic message: energy isn’t a resource, energy is clean, and energy isn’t scarce, in fact the opposite, it is abundant! Because now, with information technology, energy has become what we might call an ‘intellectual wealth’ that can be captured, stored, distributed – ‘cycled’, so to speak – by electronic coding. And as there are no limits in principle to how much ‘energy cycling’ is possible, energy itself loses the limitations we’re used to associate with it.

It is not, at first, entirely obvious or perhaps intuitive to think of energy as an ‘intellectual wealth’ that can be ‘cycled’, and so the book explains in detail how and why this is so, and it makes a compelling case for embracing this extremely relevant reality: we have more than enough energy. For the foreseeable future, and beyond. We can relax. " 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOREWORD 6

I  GENIUS 15 I THE ALTERED STATE 18 — II SEIZING THE MOMENT 19

II  THE TASk IN HAND 21 I THE RED HERRING: SUSTAINABILITY 23 — II A CATEGORICAL LEAP 24 — III THE CURRENT CONTEXT 25 — IV WHO WE ARE 27 — V WHERE WE’RE COMING FROM... 29 — VI ... AND WHERE WE WANT TO GO 37 — VII A PATHWAY OPEN TO EVERYONE 40 — VIII THE ‘POTENTIALITY Of APPLICATIONS’ 42 — IX THE ‘RESOURCE’ THAT MULTIPLIES FOREVER 44 — X THE LEVELLER: DEMOCRACY IN THE NETWORK 45

III  ENERGY IS NOT THE PROBLEM 49 I DEALING WITH OBSTACLES ON THE WAY 53 — II PREMISE PART 1: THE ISSUE IS LOGISTICS 54 — III PREMISE PART 2: WE HAVE ENERGY THAT GETS CHEAPER THE MORE Of IT WE USE 55 — IV PREMISE PART 3: THE KEY IS NETWORKED ELECTRICITY 59 — V CAN DO VS HAVE TO 61 — VI FORMULATING A DIFFERENT KIND Of QUESTION 63 — VII THE VISION: ‘ALWAYS ON’ POWER 66 — VIII OUR 135-YEAR LAG 66 — IX ABUNDANCE 68 — X THE FEAR Of GOD 69 — XI MORE IS MORE 71

IV  A QUICK REFRESHER ON ELECTRICITY 77 I THE DYNAMO/GENERATOR 83 — II AC/DC 84 — III THE TRANSFORMER 85 — IV WHERE IT ALL COMES FROM 87 — V WHERE MUCH OF IT COULD BE COMING FROM INSTEAD 88

V THE NETWORK: SHARING POWER 91 IPOWER SHIFTS Of A DIFFERENT KIND 93—II THE NETWORK EFFECT AND ENERGY 95 — III LIFE AFTER FOSSILS 97 — IV ’INTELLIGENT ENERGY’ 99 — V NETWORK TERMINOLOGY 101 — VI OUR FRIEND THE ELECTRON 102 — VII THE ENERGY NETWORK: AN ‘INTERNET OF THINGS’ 104 — VIII WHAT WE USE ENERGY FOR 108

VI  MAKING IT HAPPEN: A TURNKEY TECHNOLOGY 111 I GENESIS OF AN INVENTION 114 — II THE MISSING LINK 117 — III HOW IT WORKS 119 — IV THE DIGITALSTROM CHIP 123 — V APPLICATIONS 125 — VI NETWORK SOLIDARITY 127 — VII TRADING ELECTRICITY 131 — VIII SMART METERS 133 — IX A TYPICAL INSTALLATION 134

VII  THREE CASE STUDIES 137 I SWITZERLAND 138 — II INDIA 142 — III ETHIOPIA 146

VIII THE BIGGER PICTURE 151 I THE YOGHURT PHENOMENON 152 — II THE APPLICATION PRINCIPLE FORETOLD 156 — III CULTIVATING OUR ENERGY EXPERIENCE 158 — IV PRINTED ENERGY: PHOTOVOLTAICS 158 — V THE POWER OF EXPONENTIAL GROWTH 163 — VI ENERGY AND ARCHITECTURE 166 — VII THE ROLE Of THERMODYNAMICS 169 — VIII UNTAPPED ENERGY: EXERGY 178 — IX INFINITE SOURCES OF ENERGY 181 — X NUCLEAR 187

IX A PLANET IN CRISIS: INTELLECT TO THE RESCUE 193 I THREE GENERATIONS OF ENERGY 194 — II A PATH OF RATIONAL OPTIMISM 199 — III “THIS IS OF THE DEVIL” – FACING OPPOSITION 204 — IV THE DIFFICULTY OF THE NEW 207 — V LEAPS OF THE IMAGINATION 209 — VI POWER STORIES 211 — VII THINKING ENERGY 213 — VIII OUR EVOLVING TAKE ON ENERGY 215 — IX ABSTRACT ENERGY 216 — X ENERGY AND SYMBOLS 219 — XI NUMBERS AND ELECTRICITY 223 — XII POWER THROUGH THOUGHT 229 — XIII MEDIAL ENERGY 230 — XIV POPULATIONS AND MODELS 232—XV LEARNING TO LOVE UNCERTAINTY 237 — XVI BEYOND TECHNOLOGY 239

X THE OUTLOOK: WHAT NEXT? 243 I AND WHAT ABOUT ME? 246

CONCLUSION 250
APPENDIX 253
REFERENCE 257 

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Just OUT: Special Edition of MINNESOTA REVIEW on NEW MATERIALIST GENEALOGIES
Aug
16
5:00pm 5:00pm

Just OUT: Special Edition of MINNESOTA REVIEW on NEW MATERIALIST GENEALOGIES

the minnesota review: New Materialist Genealogies

Guest-edited by Vera Bühlmann, Felicity Colman, Iris van der Tuin
Volume 2017, Number 88, 2017

Access to journal HERE.
Note 'NM Special Focus' is located in middle section. 

http://minnesotareview.dukejournals.org/content/current 

 

Extract from introduction below:

VERA BÜHLMANN, FELICITY COLMAN, AND IRIS VAN DER TUIN
INTRODUCTION TO NEW MATERIALIST GENEALOGIES
NEW MATERIALISMS, NOVEL MENTALITIES, QUANTUM LITERACY

Like the new materialist turn, feminist new materialist scholarship (Haraway 1988; Barad 2007) draws attention to a novel understanding of literacy that incorporates code and is not limited to linguistic registers of grammar, syntax, and semantics (Haraway 1997). At stake is the conception of literacy, whose articulations are capable of organizing the generative potential/contingency of the expressions and forms of conceptions as real things.

From the materialist investigations that coalesced through and in the merger of the sciences with humanities research (notably in Bergson 2004; Haraway 1988, 1991, 1997; Barad 2007; Lévy-Leblond 1976, 1999; Plotnitsky 2006, 2009), new materialist investigations join as part of a paradigmatic shift that we witnessed occurring across the pedagogic landscape of the early twenty-first century in environmental humanities, science, and technology studies as well as across the humanities and in the sciences (see Dolphijn and van der Tuin 2012). In the humanities, some of these shifts are articulated under the concepts explored in postcapitalist, posthumanist, and postcolonial positions. In the sciences, these new fields that opened in the twentieth century manifest, transversally rather than disciplinarily, the roles that informatics, systems theory, and cybernetics have de facto come to play in all fields (Wiener 1948; Bateson 1972; Whitehead 2011; Margulis and Sagan 2008; Hayles 2012). These investigations all result in a change in the narratives concerning knowledge forms, their production, and their meaning (Floridi 2015; Lyotard [1979] 1984; Serres 1969–80; Terranova 2004).

Through our study of new materialist research, what we have come to discern is that this new materialist literacy has in part come about as part of a consideration of the methods that feature in the twentieth century in “quantum-thinking.” The epistemological as well as the ontological status of these methods in their practice—that is, in their current actualization—have largely unsettled the pedagogical landscape as a whole, and they are profoundly disturbing from the
point of view of both objectivist and subjectivist philosophy. In effect, there are numerous attempts at disentangling—often in orthodox fashion—the disturbing co-incidence of information and energy, of code and matter, that we witness in electro-technics and informatics.

Continue reading HERE

CONTENTS

Monika Rogowska-Stangret: Corpor(e)al Cartographies of New MaterialismMeeting the Elsewhere Halfway

Whitney Stark: Assembled BodiesReconfiguring Quantum Identities

Marie-Luise Angerer: Moving Forces

Marc Kosciejew: A Material-Documentary LiteracyDocuments, Practices, and the Materialization of Information

Iris van der Tuin: Signals FallingReading Woolf and Guattari Diffractively for a New Materialist Epistemology

Elizabeth de Freitas: Nonhuman Findings from the Laboratory of Speculative Sociology

Helen Palmer: Stein Does Proteus at Sunset on Blackpool Promenade

Helen Palmer: RAWR

Helen Palmer: Jellyfish

Helen Palmer: Break

REVIEWS

Stanimir Panayotov: Speculum of the Pruning-Scissors(on Katerina Kolozova and Eileen A. Joy, eds., After the “Speculative Turn”: Realism, Philosophy, and Feminism)

Nathalie Blanc: The Strange Agencies and the Seaside(on Stacy Alaimo, Exposed: Environmental Politics and Pleasures in Posthuman Times)

-------------------------------

Please refer also to: http://newmaterialism.eu

COST Action IS1307 New Materialism: Networking European Scholarship on 'How Matter Comes to Matter'.

 

 

 

  

 

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Jul
13
4:00pm 4:00pm

Guest Lecture: "Food is the New Internet – ?"

Am Donnerstag 13. Juli 2017, 4 pm at ATTP

Transformative Technologien in der Lebensmittelproduktion
Prozesse und Produkte für die Lebensmittelmärkte in der neuen Gegenwart

. Organisationsentwicklung als Voraussetzung für technologische Innovation
. Mehr vom Guten durch kontinuierliche Prozesstechnik und Direktverarbeitung auf dem Feld
. Transparenz in der Wertschöpfungskette damit Vertrauen entstehen kann
. Transformative Führung zwischen einer anderen und der besten Praxis

Prof. Dr. Tilo Hühn

ZHAW Life Sciences und Facility Management, Wädenschwil Schweiz
https://www.zhaw.ch/de/ueber-uns/person/htil/
 

Dozent im Studiengang Lebensmitteltechnologie:
Lehrveranstaltungen: Getränke (Modulleitung), Getränkeherstellung, Getränkerohstoffe,
Lebensmittelmarketing, Marketingplanspiel, Personalführung
 

Dozent im Masterstudiengang Life Sciences:
Vertiefung Food & Beverage Innovation
Lehrveranstaltungen: Innovation (Modulleitung), Product and Process Design, Mentoring Program

http://www.beverages.ch

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Panel Discussion: CODE AND MATERIALITY
May
18
6:00pm 6:00pm

Panel Discussion: CODE AND MATERIALITY

  • ehemaliges k. und k. Post- und Telegraphenamt (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Panel-Discussion (Part of this years “Entwerfenausstellung” - organised by the Faculty of Architecture and Planning, TU Wien)

    Start: 18:00 / Zollergasse 31, 1070 Wien

    Moderation: Vera Bühlmann (ATTP, TU Wien)

    Panelists: Kristina Schinegger (SOMA), Christoph Müller, Oliver Schürer (ATTP, TU Wien)

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May
3
to May 4

May 3/4 2017 EU Horizon 2020 ETHICS OF CODING

Towards a Quantum Literacy: Spectral Sovereignty, Citizenship, and Personhood in a Digital World

May 3-4 2017

EoC seminar “Ethical Coding” at Technical University Vienna, Department for Architectural Theory and Philosophy of Technics ATTP

May 3 2017     8:00 pm – 22:00 pm  Public Evening Lecture (Kuppelsaal TU Vienna, Main Building)

May 4 2017     9:30am – 7:00 pm Seminar  (if you are interested to join please mail to vera.buehlmann@tuwien.ac.at) at the ATTP Seminar Space, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 7, Hof, Stiege 2, floor 1. 

Ethics of Coding: A Report on the Algorithmic Condition            
Project 732407 funded under H2020-EU.2.1.1. - INDUSTRIAL LEADERSHIP - Leadership in enabling and industrial technologies - Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/207025_en.html

 

Program

May 3rd 2017

7:30 pm                 Welcome  Apero, Kuppelsaal TU Wien

8:00- 8:30 pm     
“Quantum Literacy and the Speed of Thought”, introduction by Vera Bühlmann, TU Vienna

8:30-9:30 pm      
“Digital Citizenship and the Acquisition of Privacy” Ludger Hovestadt (ETH Zurich, Chair for CAAD ITA) & Marcel Alexander Niggli (University Fribourg, Law and Philosophy)

9:30- 10:30pm     
“Ways of making use of Data: Recording, Sourcing, Storing, Dealing with data – coding as writing? As trading? As giving an account? As bearing witness?
roundtable with Marcel Alexander Niggli, Ludger Hovestadt, Elie Ayache, Antoinette Rouvroy, Philippe Morel, Anne-Françoise Schmid. Moderation by Vera Bühlmann

May 4th 2017

9:15-9:45 am         Coffee & Croissants welcome   

9:45 -10:00am     
Ethics of Coding: Human Algorithmic Condition, the project introduction by Felicity Colman, Kingston University, London

10:00 – 11:00 am
“How to ´address´ data?” Antoinette Rouvroy, Université de Namur / Centre de Recherche Information, Droit et Société (CRIDS)

11:00 – 12:00 am
“Money as the Currency of Thought”, Philippe Morel, Digital Knowledge Center, ENSA Paris-Malaquais

12:00-2:00 pm     Lunch

2:00-3:00 pm      
“Price Writing”, Elie Ayache, ITO33 Paris

3:00-4:00 pm      
“Genericness, Knowledge, Time” Anne-Francoise Schmid, Associate professor of epistemology and philosophy, INSA de Lyon

4:00-4:30 pm       Coffee Break

4:30-5:30 pm      
Discussion, Ethics of Coding Project Team, all presenters, audience.

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LIXIL International Student Competition Finale / RADIANT FIELD
Apr
19
8:30am 8:30am

LIXIL International Student Competition Finale / RADIANT FIELD

  • Diamond Room (South), Keidanren Kaikan 4F (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

We are very excited and honored to be invited to the Open Final Screening and to be one of the top three universities that have passed the preliminary selection out of the twelve invitational universities from ten countries.

The final screening in Tokyo will take place on April 19, 2017 (Wed) 8:30~12:30 (CET, GMT+2).

The link to the live stream is here: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/PSWRaAHQSWH

A+U (Engl./Jap. architecture and urbanism journal) is hosting the live stream: https://twitter.com/aupublishing

Our team is comprised of architecture students Ivan Matas, Lena Kohlmayr, Patrick Aprent, Raphaela Schiefersteiner, Dominik Fill and instructors Prof. Vera Bühlmann, Benjamin Reynolds and Valle Medina.

Our very special external advisors are Prof. Ludger Hovestadt (Chair of Computer Architecture Aided Design at ETH Zurich) and Matthew Cowan (artist).

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