Jan
17
6:00 PM18:00

Igor Guatelli: Traces of the Other

Traces of the other

a conceptual reflexion about the identity and alterity of the urban space through its ontic and synaptic dimensions

Prof. Post-Doc. Igor Guatelli

Architect and Urbanist (FAU-USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil) holding a Doctorate degree with concentration in French Philosophy at FFLCH-USP (Brazil) and a post-doctorate degree at Gerphau- ENSA Paris-La Villette.
He is also an associate Researcher of Gerphau – Laboratoire de Philosophie et Urbain Architecture and University Paris 8 (France), design project professor at Architecture and Urbanism School of Universidade Mackenzie (Sao Paulo, Brazil) and Coordinator of the research-group “City, Architecture and Philosophy”.
Author of the book “Architecture of the in-between places: about the importance of the conceptual works”.

View Event →
Dec
7
6:30 PM18:30

Quantum Words on Architectonic Objects // THE TABLE // Published Online !

Website online: https://quantumwords.persona.co

 

Quantum Words on Architectonic Objects

Quantum. The unit of emitted energy. Circulating and translating between all things tangible and graspable. Quantum Words on Architectonic Objects are diligent articulations of ordinary things. They are distinctive for the architect ́s ability to offer a richness of detail and insight within no less than five hundred and no more than a thousand words of print. Short enough to be read while drinking an espresso and significant enough to delight the reader with the accepted diversion.

***
First in a series:

The Table in the light of Quantity and the Precious.

Invitation to short contributions on: 

THE TABLE
500-1000 words,
English or German

mail to: vera.buehlmann[at]attp.tuwien.ac.at

***

edited by
Vera Bühlmann, Emmanuelle Chiappone-Piriou, Georg Fassl,
ATTP Technische Universität Wien August 2017

***

Architectonic Objects Digital Weather Conditions

Digital Fabrication, Smart Cities, the Internet of Things, Big Data, Rationalisation and the Digital Production Chain, Semantic and Object-Oriented Ontologies, Automated Process Design, and Parametrism as the "New International Style": Increasingly so, everything gets connected with everything else in a global kind of intellectual and entropic climate. The temporal currents brings us but modulations of the past. Intellectual tempests are cooking up here and there. Architectural ideas pour like rain from ideational cluster-clouds. Information floods are washing away the shores of long cultivated fields. Fresh breezes are local, recurrent, often they are pleasantly mild.

A building is what withstands the weather. The Quantum Words on Architectonic Objects series wants to cultivate the architectural object amidst this plenty of climatic influences. It reaches out to architects (and other intellectuals) in order to learn articulating what is precious about architecture.

Our Theorem:

What is an architectonic object? An architectonic object is an ordinary object, one we find exposed from what it may once have been conceived as. It may not have lost its mystical appeal altogether, but we have long learned to live with it – to live with it well, and this without fully comprehending it. The architectonic object is an object whose parts are elementary but mobile, whose components are modular yet can be measured (not only calculated), whose balances are asymmetrical and yet producing stability. 

***

First in a Series of Architectonic Objects: The Table

The first Architectonic Object we would like to articulate in Quantum Words is that of The Table.

We sit at tables for having diner or breakfast. A table is the sine qua non of every banquet. It stands on four feet and levels a plane in between. A table erects a stable board in distance to the ground. Empty, the table provides the iconic site of modern, experimental methods of investigation. When organised into rows and columns a table provides the iconic site of keeping records, collecting data, organising knowledge. It feeds tax agents just as much as computers. The Round Table lives forth, from King Arthur ́s time onwards, as the iconic site for reconciliation. It is well known to facilitate a flat hierarchy among noble men. In the Symposium, the table manifests the fondness for mixing wine and intellectual discussion.

What open secrets, what precious stories, can we unlock from the role this architectonic object plays in the different architectural disciplines today? How are tables used in Structural Design? In Digital Architecture? In Building Physics? In Social Housing? In City Planning? in Baukunst? In Building Conservation? In Baroque Architecture? In Le Corbusier ́s machines-for-living-in? What does the table, as an architectonic object, afford in the different disciplines? what does it present, what does it exclude, what does it organise, what does it provide, what does it demand, what does it conserve? 

***

On the Quantum Words Series

Motto
English: The Very Many and the Big Plenty: Quantity and the Precious
German: Das Sehr Viele und das Grosse Reichliche: Quantität und das Kostbare

How could "the many" possibly be "intensified"? How could something that is abundantly full be measured? How can we rationalise what is not determinably finite and scarce? what could possibly be the unit of such measurement, and even worse, how on earth should we think of the reference magnitude for such a unit? Linguistically speaking, we have here (with The Very Many and the Big Plenty) an intensive qualifier for the many, a measuring adjective for the abundantly full – is this not a sheer mess of category mistakes, a kind of a logical disaster? For any (classically) logical idea of objects, speaking of The Very Many and The Big Plenty certainly is not a phrasing that makes much sense.

Logical Statements (Definition and Order)

That ́s because logics is committed to an understanding of the static that is rooted in a notion of order. Logics deals with statements relative to either cosmical, metaphysical, ontological, or mathematical order. Motion and rest must exclude one another in the states that are at stake in logics, and the same goes for any other pair of, in a logical sense, contradictory notions. Our phrasings, in their paradoxical set ups, could hence not play a legitimate role in any logical argument.

Rhetorical Stasis (Consensus and Order)

Different from logics, rhetorics knew a term that specifically designates set-ups whose starting positions appear to be in contradiction with each other: If two opponents, for a combat in sophistication, enter debate with two competing lines of argumentation, what has to be established first is a middle ground between them. This, in rhetorics, is called Stasis. Stasis literally means a standing still. It designated a state of stability, in which all forces are equal and opposing, and therefore cancel each other out.

Including the Operations of a General Equivalent (Algebra and Money)

How exactly such rhetorical stasis is different from the kind of stasis at stake in logics, this is a large and unsettled issues of which we can perhaps say that it is transversal to philosophy at large. After all, is a notion of order not characterised in the same manner, as a state of stability in which all forces are equal and opposing, and therefore cancelling each other out? is this not why, from understanding the order of things, we can learn to manipulate them? Marcel Hénaff, the anthropologist, has recently caught up with the history of this conflict in his beautiful book entitled The Price of Truth (2003). This is why we aim at linking up with the interplay between quality and quantity.

Statues: Set Up to Keep Something Present

There is another context in which phrases of the kind we are dealing with here might be approached. We might conceive of the paradoxical topic the try to capture best as a kind of statue, literally the set up of something to be kept present, to be remembered, from stature, "to cause to stand, set up."

If such set ups were not logically consistent, so the Ancient Greeks knew already, they will not be capable of maintaining themselves. The stability they put forward, hence, would not be a stability at all: it is bound to corrupt, to degenerate, to become something unstable, something that is capable of decay. Such statues could still appear as beautiful though. Just like poetic verse could appear as beautiful. The Ancient Greeks had a word for this kind of beauty, they called those statues daedalus. Not because the mythical figure of Daedalus, the first architect purported by legend, would alone have been believed as capable of crafting them. But because the legendary first architect was the first to build statues from parts that were modular and mobile: Daedalus was the first to build mechanical statues, statues capable of transporting a certain condition from one situation to another, where the same condition appears, at first, as ill fitted, if not entirely out of place. Mechanics was considered as an art, in the sense that it required the kind of cunning that would translate, literally carry across or bridge, odd situations like Minos ́ wife wishing to mate with the bull that Minos, the king of Crete, had kept from Zeus by cheating on him.

Mechanics and Art, Nature and Culture

In mechanics, indeed, rest and motion need not exclude one another – quite the opposite. They are treated by the mechanic in a way that knows how to keep the balances between them in a variety of manners. The mechanic was he who knew how to distribute the weights between the sides of the scale such as to yield a certain effect repeatedly, objectively, intended and yet completely independent from his subjective will. Is the top of a spinning circle at rest or is it rotating? Problems like these are often treated by the first scientists. Mathematically, they could be rigorously described (by Archimedes for example, who remained one of the most inspiring influences for architects and artists alike throughout the centuries). But logically, they remained problematic. We have here, perhaps, the very theme that underlies the distinction between things artificial and things natural. 

Architectonic Objects: The Whole Picture and The Mobile Partition

With our Quantum Words on Architectonic Objects we want to leave unresolved these philosophical disputes between what we could call The Whole Picture (logical order) and The Mobile Partition (mechanical order, rhetorical stasis, or crafted statues). We want to treat them in the Quantum Way: we seek to acknowledge that there must be a way to accommodate both perspectives, in like manner as in quantum physics, where we can measure the speed of a particle as well as its location, but not both at once.

How could we go about such measurement in architecture? Via objects. We cannot do so without a form of mediacy. Like the mobile statues once called daedalus, objects of the most ordinary kind are caught up in a contradictory activity too: the pot contains but also excludes. A floor supports but also lifts up from the ground. A roof covers but also exposes a structure to the weather. A wall separates rooms but also connects them.

Remembering ordinary objects in terms of their double facedness, we want to address them as Architectonic Objects: object whose parts are elementary but mobile, whose components are modular yet can be measured, whose balances are asymmetrical yet producing stability. An architectonic object is an ordinary object, one which may not have lost its mystical appeal altogether but which can be accounted for quantitatively. 

View Event →
Dec
7
to Dec 9

DEC 7-9 2017 // SOPHISTICATION CONFERENCE

Conference Program Brochure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 7-9, 2017 TU Vienna

Sophistication: Rhetorical, Geometrical, and Computational "Articulation"

A Symposium on Architecture, Technics, Theory, and Thinking

December 7 2017
Kuppelsaal TU Vienna (Main Building)

 

19:00 - 19:15

WELCOME
Prof. Dr. Vera Bühlmann | architecture theory and philospophy, TU Wien, ATTP

19:15 - 19:30 

EUROPE AND THE UNIVERSITY, A concerned Statement (video lecture)
Prof. Dr. Rosi Braidotti | philosophy, cultural studies and gender studies, Utrecht University

19:30 - 19:45

PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA AND ARCHITECTURE
by Dr. Oliver Schürer | architecture theory | TU Wien, ATTP

19:45 - 21:30

ON HUMAN DIGNITY
Pico della Mirandola, 1486
read by Sebastian Michael | writer, film director and actor | London

21:30 - 21:45

RESPONSE: Giuseppe Longo
information science and philosophy
École Normale Supérieure, Paris | Tufts University, Boston

22:00 - 22:30

WHAT ARE MASTERPIECES AND WHY ARE THERE SO FEW OF THEM
Gertrude Stein, 1935
read by Martin Burr | réalisateur | Basel

drinks and finger food will be provided throughout the evening 

 

December 8 2017
TU Vienna (Prechtl Saal, Main Building)

 

Amidst: somewhere between "a lot" and "too much" 

9:30-10:00 

Welcome, Coffee and Croissants 

10:00-10:40 

ABSTRACTION AND GENEROSITY
Prof. Dr. Vera Bühlmann | architecture theory and philosophy
TU Wien ATTP

10:40-11:00 

11:00-11:30 

11:30-12:10
 

12:10-12:30 

12:30-14:30 

14:30-15:10



 

15:10-15:30 

15:30-16:00 

16:00-16:40
 


16:40-17:00

Discussion

Coffee Break

ON IMPOSTURE
Dr. Alexi Kukuljevic | philosopher and writer | Berlin

Discussion

Lunch Break

MINDSET, PENTECOST, STOPWATCH: ONLINE SOURCES,
OR HOW TO RECOGNISE THE BEGINNING AND THE END OF AN IDEA

Dr. Jorge Orozco | architecture theory | ETH Zürich, CAAD


Discussion 

Coffee Break

ARCHITECTURAL MATHESIS
Prof. Dr. Frédéric Migayrou
| architecture theory
The Bartlett School of Architecture | Centre Pompidou

Discussion 

 

December 9 2017
TU Vienna (Prechtl Saal, Main Building)

Ever again: mathematics, models, architecture 

9:30-10:00

Welcome, Coffee and Croissants

10:00-10:40

 

THE TROUBLE WITH ALGEBRA: ART AND METHOD OF INVENTION
Prof. Dr. Roy Wagner
| philosophy | ETH Zürich

10:40-11:00

Discussion

11:00-11:30

Coffee Break

11:30-12:10

A MATHEMATICAL CRITIQUE OF COMPUTATIONAL THINKING
IN THE SCIENCES OF NATURE
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Longo
| information science and philosophy
École Normale Supérieure Paris | Tufts University Boston

12:10-12:30

Discussion

12:30-14:30

Lunch Break

14:30-15:10

THE INFORMATIONAL MOTOR:
ARCHITECTONICS, ALGORITHMIC REASONING AND ABSTRACTION
Dr. Michael Doyle
| architecture theory | TU Wien, ATTP

15:10-15:30

15:30-16:00

Discussion

Coffee Break

16:00-16:40

ANADYOMENE AND THE BEAUTY OF THE TROUBLESOME:
GNOMONICS OF SPECTRALITY
AS THE ART OF EMBRACING OBSTACLES
Prof. Dr. Elias Zafiris
| mathematics | Athens University

16:40-17:00

Discussion

17:00-17:30

Coffee Break

17:30-18:10

A TREATISE ON DIGITAL ARCHITECTURE
Prof. Dr. Ludger Hovestadt
| architecture and information science
ETH Zürich, CAAD

18:10-18:30

Discussion

 

ON HUMAN DIGNITY

Pico della Mirandola, (De Hominis Dignitate, 1486)
read by Sebastian Michael | writer, lm director and actor | London

Giovanni Pico della Mirandola was approaching his twenty-fourth birthday when he invited
any interested scholars to come, at his expense, to a public disputation in Rome of 900 theses he himself had just published, under the title Conclusiones philosophicae, cabalisticae et theologicae, in December 1486.He immediately found himself under attack. On the one hand for the outrageous boldness of his undertaking – the vast number of theses and the spectrum they covered – and on the other for what was perceived as his sheer arrogance of youth: that at his age he should presume to have anything to say at all was enough. That he said it with such ourish and panache riled the establishment and angered the church.Much more signi cant, though, and of lasting impact to this day, is the ambition of his thought. Paul Oskar Kristeller
in The Renaissance Philosophy of Man – a book he co-edited and wrote the Introduction for, speaks of Pico’s extensive range of learning that “absorbs many di erent ideas and traditions that most of his contemporaries would have considered incompatible.” What makes this work stand out is the way it encapsulates in a relatively short text – some eleven thousand words
in English – both the scope and the stance of a young man at a point in history when the
world is rapidly and radically, categorically, changing. It has been called a ‘Manifesto for the Renaissance’, as well as the ‘most elegant oration’ (oratio elegantissima), uniting, as it does, upon itself two central themes, that of human dignity, and the ideal of a universal harmony among philosophers and their schools of thought.From within these, one concept more than any other shines out, much like a beacon: freedom. For Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, what truly distinguishes the human from any other being – animal or celestial – is our freedom to choose to become what we will. With this freedom comes, of course, our responsibility, but
also our right to practice philosophy. And this Oration is a robust defence of the human right
to think freely. Equally emphatic is Pico’s disgust with the commodi cation of education, and the prevailing, snide anti-intellectualism of his day. No wonder he speaks to us now...Pico never held his Oration. It was penned as the opening speech of his disputation, planned for early 1487, but Pope Innocent VIII suspended the event and instead set up a commission to examine Pico’s 900 theses for heresy. Pico promptly recycled the second half of the Oration in an Apologia, but this did not solve his problems: he faced years of persecution, and in 1494, two years after the death of his patron and protector, the powerful Lorenzo de’ Medici, Pico, together with
his friend Poliziano, was murdered in Florence – as exhuming them both in 2007 established
– by arsenic poisoning. Originally known simply as Oratio, and rst published posthumously
by Giovanni’s nephew Francesco Pico in 1496, the title soon acquired the addition by which
it is today generally known and became the Oratio de hominis dignitate – the Oration on the Dignity of Man.

 

Bio

 “I think, write and create across disciplines in theatre, lm, video, print and online with a deepening interest in humans, the multiverse and a quantum philosophy.”

Sebastian’s stage plays range from contemporary relationship drama (The Power of Love) and the topical examination of religious fervour (Elder Latimer is in Love), to the ‘apocalyptic comedy’ Top Story, and a celebration of Shakespeare’s poetry in The Sonneteer. His short lms and debut feature The Hour of Living have been screened at festivals worldwide, and he has published one novel, Angel, as well as the ‘picture story book for grown-ups’ The Snow ake Collector, which originated from his current ongoing online experiment EDEN by FREI – ‘a concept narrative in the here & now about the where, the wherefore and forever.’

Sebastian is a contributing author to A Quantum City (Eds. Hovestadt/ Bühlmann, Birkhäuser, 2015) and co-author, with Ludger Hovestadt and Vera Bühlmann, of A Genius Planet (Birkhäuser 2017). He is guest lecturer at the Department for Architecture Theory and the Philosophy of Technics at TU Wien.

Sebastian lives in London and works wherever his projects take him. 


EUROPE AND THE UNIVERSITY - A concerned Statement
Prof. Dr. Rosi Braidotti | philosophy, cultural studies and gender studies | Utrecht University

 

Bio

 Rosi Braidotti is an Distinguished University Professor and founding Director
of the Centre for the Humanities at Utrecht University. An established scholar in the eld of Continental philosophy and epistemology, feminist and gender theories and post-structuralist thought, she is also a world gure in gender and critical theory. Braidotti set up in 1989 the Network of Interdisciplinary Women’s Studies in Europe (NOI&SE) within the Erasmus Programme. From 1997 to 2005 she was the founding scienti c director of the SOCRATES Thematic Network for European Women’s Studies ATHENA, which was awarded in 2010 the Erasmus Prize of the Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Commission for outstanding contribution to social inclusion. Among her book publications are: Nomadic Subjects (second edition, revised and enlarged, 2011, Columbia University Press); La Philosophie, là oú on ne l’attend pas, Larousse, Paris, 2009; Metamorphoses: Towards a Materialist Theory of Becoming, Polity Press, Cambridge 2002. 


PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA AND ARCHITECTURE

by Dr. Oliver Schürer | architecture theory | TU Wien, ATTP

 

Bio

Oliver Schürer, Senior Scientist Dipl.-Ing. Dr.techn., is researcher, curator, editor
and author as well as Senior Scientist at the Department for Architecture Theory
and Philosophy of Technics, Vienna University of Technology. He did numerous research projects, guest lectures, events, and international publications mainly
on the cultural relations of technology and media in architecture. In 2015, he founded the transdisciplinary research group H.A.U.S. among humanities, engineering and arts, researching “Humanoid robots in Architecture and Urban Spaces”. 


RESPONSE: Giuseppe Longo
information science and philosophy
École Normale Supérieure, Paris | Tufts University, Boston

 

Bio

 Giuseppe Longo is Directeur de Recherche (DRE) CNRS at Centre Interdisciplinaire Cavaillès, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris andAdjunct Professor, Department of Integrative Physiology and Pathobiology, Tufts University, Boston. He is a
former Professor of Mathematical Logic and, later, of Computer Science at the University of Pisa. In the ‘80s, he spent 3 years in the USA (U.C.Berkeley, M.I.T., Carnegie Mellon) as researcher and Visiting Professor. GL isfounder and former director (1990-2015) of Mathematical Structures in Computer Science, a Cambridge U.P. journal. Since the late ‘90s, he extended his research interests to the Epistemology of Mathematics and Theoretical Biology. He (co-)authored more

than 100 papers and three books: with A. Asperti, on Categories, Types and Structures (M.I.T. Press, 1991); with F. Bailly, Mathematics and the natural sciences: The Physical Singularity of Life(Hermann, Paris, 2006; Imperial College Press, London, 2011); with M. Montévil, Perspectives on Organisms: Biological Time, Symmetries and Singularities (Springer, Berlin, 2014). With A.Soto and D. Noble, Longo edited (and co-authored six papers) of a 2016 special issue of Prog Biophys Mol Biol, From the century of the genome to the century of the organism: New theoretical approaches. He directs a research project at IEA-Nantes (2014-20) on the concept of law, in human and natural sciences. 


WHAT ARE MASTERPIECES AND WHY ARE THERE SO FEW OF THEM
Gertrude Stein, 1935
read by Martin Burr | réalisateur | Basel

 

Abstract on the Public Reading (by Martin Burr):
I was almost going to write an abstract and let you read what masterpieces are and why there are so few of them, at least according to Gertrude Stein and me. Therefore I was going to describe and getting to the point of this lecture, but actually it is impossible to describe and getting to the point because describing essentially has nothing to do with hitting a point. Describing is tracing outlines of a figure which in itself has no single description. It is like a state of not being able to remember the word I want and through movements of thinking grasping a few stars describing ellipses in the heavens.

 

Bio

Martin Burr, born 1973 in Basel, Switzerland. Bachelor of Arts und Bachelor of Music at the Royal Conservatory and the Royal Academy of Art (Den Haag, NL). Collaborations with the Ensemble Hollandia until 1998. Between 2000 and 2002 Lecturer for Music Theater at the Academy for Theater in Zürich and engagements as a composer and Regisseur at the Schauspielhaus Zurich. Until 2005 director of the theater Scène 2 (Senones, F). He currently works as the director of Imprimerie Basel, a Studiospace for the Arts and Sciences.


ABSTRACTION AND GENEROSITY: ON INTELLECTUALITY TODAY

Prof. Dr. Vera Bühlmann | architecture theory and philosophy TU Wien ATTP

Abstract:

For apprehending a simple line for what it is, the Art Historian Wilhelm Worringer writes in Abstraction and Empathy (Abstraktion und Einfühlung) from 1906, “I have to expand my inner vision till it embraces the whole line; I have inwardly to delimit what I have thus apprehended and extract it, as an entity, from its surroundings.” Worringer foregrounded thereby a particular kind of psycho-motoric activity, which he called "apperceptive action", as a means for attending to the socio-political role of art in relation to an individual subject´s aesthetical sense and cultural technical "progress". This paper will discuss Worringer´s proposal beyond the strictly disciplinary scope of Art History, and extend its concerns to the societal role of "Intellectuality" at large. It proposes to consider Worringer´s psycho-motoric activity in relation to the economy of an active life. 

With Abstraction and Generosity, this paper proposes a generalised concept-couple that is to relate the concerns raised by Worringer one hundred years ago to our own situation, with regard to what it means to date an object: Inevitably, Datafication too involves an "apperceptive activity." But, this paper asks, Where to locate, and how to identify the "subjectivity" to which this psycho-motoric activity is to be attributed? Key points of reference will involve also John Stuart Mill´s theory of "naming" in his A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive (1836), Dante Alighieri´s Convivio (in German: Das Gastmahl, 1306), Rem Koolhaas´s Generic City (1995).
 

 

Bio

Vera Bühlmann is Professor for Architecture Theory at Vienna University of Technology, and director of the ATTP Department since 2016. She originally studied English Literature and Language, Philosophy, and Media Studies at Zurich University, and earned a PHD in Media Philosophy/Philosophy of Technics from Basel University in 2009. Together with Ludger Hovestadt, she is co-founder of the applied virtuality lab in 2010, at the Chair for Computer Aided Architectural Design at ETH Zurich, where she had been teaching since 2008. She is Co-editor of the Applied Virtuality Book Series (Birkhäuser, since 2012). Her newest monograph is under contract with Bloomsbury Press, London, and will be entitled Mathematics and Information in the Philosophy of Michel Serres (2018, forthcoming). 

 

Web: www.tuwien.academia.edu/VeraBühlmann


ON IMPOSTURE
Dr. Alexi Kukuljevic | philosopher and writer | Berlin

Abstract:

Plato describes the sophist as a mimetician (mimetikes): one who excels in appearing to be the thing it is not, an imposter. In this paper, I will consider the relationship between mimesis, imposture, and the philosopher’s effort to think the paradoxical being of non-being. Through a close engagement with Plato’s Sophist, I will follow how the effort to render imposture ridiculous demands that we think in turn the ridiculousness of being, exposing the close relationship between education, thought, and humor. 

Bio

Alexi Kukuljevic is an artist and a philosopher based in Berlin.  His book, Liquidation World: On the Art of Living Absently was published this Fall by MIT Press.  His work has been exhibited at institutions such as the Palais de Tokyo, Paris and the ICA in Philadelphia. He is a lecturer in art theory at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna.  He recently had a solo exhibition exhibition, entitled BIRDWAR, at Åplus in Berlin.   


MIND PALACE, PENTECOST, STOPWATCH: ONLINE SOURCES, OR HOW TO RECOGNIZE THE BEGINNING AND THE END OF AN IDEA

Dr. Jorge Orozco| | architecture theory | ETH Zürich, CAAD

 

Abstract:

When we ask IBM Watson online what it sees in Diego Velázquez’s Las Meninas, it is 66% sure to recognize a ‘little theater’ with ‘female faces’ of age ‘18 to 34’. When we ask the same question to Michel Foucault, he sees a void, an empty space surrounded by objects pointing to it. Even when both see elements in Velázquez’s work, they don’t treat it in the same manner. Foucault is interested in what the elements can do and tell, locally and vividly, as the masterpiece is alive and talking to him. While Watson is interested in recognizing what the elements are, globally and taxonomically, as its success is measured by the accuracy with which it links them to global definitions.

This talk will address the information that circulates on web communities by sourcing and modeling it with instruments similar to Watson’s, but with interests similar to Foucault’s, that is, decoupling from recognition of global definitions and focusing on asking architectural questions. Showing the capacities and abilities that are gained with applications that ‘talk’ about architecture from the abundance of information.

Bio

Jorge Orozco is a post-doctoral researcher at the Chair for Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD), ETH Zurich. His PhD thesis titled “Indexical Architecture. Prominent positions, applications and the Web” deals with the abundance of online information in architecture. It argues for a more vivid and capacious understanding of architecture by affirming and embracing the information that circulates ad infinitum on the Web.

Jorge completed his PhD research supervised by Prof. Dr. Ludger Hovestadt at the Chair for CAAD. He holds a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Computer Aided Architectural Design from ETH Zurich, and a Master in Advanced Architecture degree with specialization in Digital Tectonics from IAAC, Barcelona. Jorge graduated from Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo’s Faculty of Architecture, Mexico.


THE INFORMATIONAL MOTOR:
ARCHITECTONICS, ALGORITHMIC REASONING AND ABSTRACTION

Dr. Michael Doyle | architecture theory | TU Wien, ATTP

 

Abstract:

Confronted by the mysteries of the world, humanity has developed various strategies to create meaning from the incomprehensible.  From ritual and custom to geometry and algebra, models of religion and science have attempted to bring a world of heterogeneous entities into a common space and time.  Such models, however, risk excluding that which is external to their model. The creation of a communicational space founded upon inclusion rather than exclusion requires a new sort of instrument of cognition—an informational motor—which would be able to decipher order in an otherwise noisy contingency. Looking at the work of Michel Serres, Roman Architect Vitruvius and others, I argue that, just as the atomist physics of Ancient Greece challenged the model of a pantheistic world, quantum physics continues to challenge the model of classical physics. With both algorithmic and abstract reasoning, however, we can build informational motors fuelled by contingency and powered by the very heterogeneity most models seek to exclude.

Bio

Michael R. Doyle is assistant project researcher and lecturer at the ATTP (TU Wien) and postdoctoral researcher at the Laboratory for Environmental and Urban Economics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL).   He holds an M.Arch. and M.Sc.Arch. from Laval University (Canada) and a PhD from the EPFL.  His research interests and activities span from the challenges facing research methods in design and planning by the evolution of computational technics and the availability and quantity of data to the bodies of theory with which novel methods can be invented to cope with contingency today.


THE TROUBLE WITH ALGEBRA: ART AND METHOD OF INVENTION

Prof. Dr. Roy Wagner | philosophy | ETH Zürich

 

Abstract: 

The talk will begin with a review of Jacob Klein's explanation of the emergence of symbolic algebra in early modern Europe (Viète, Descartes, Wallis) in terms of a philosophical change of perspective.
I will contrast his view with an explanation that builds on economic practices that became prevalent in late medieval and Renaissance Italy.
If time permits I will present some modern innovations concerning mathematical practice with algebraic symbols as well.
The purpose of this exercise is to show the different layers of reasoning involved in generating new algebraic conceptions and practices.
Understanding these different layers will support a more general understanding of formal innovation, both sophistic or sophisticated.

Bio

Received a math PhD (1997) and a history and philosophy of science Ph.D. (2007) from Tel Aviv University.
Published on the history and philosophy of mathematics using case studies from a wide range of times and places representing various mathematical cultures.
Books: Post-structural readings of Gödel's proof (2009), Breaking and making mathematical sense: histories and philosophies of mathematical practice (2017).
Also published papers in the area of critical theory/resistance studies. 


A MATHEMATICAL CRITIQUE OF COMPUTATIONAL THINKING IN THE SCIENCES OF NATURE
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Longo | information science and philosophy Ecole Normale Supérieure Paris | Tufts University Boston

 

Abstract


The singularity of human life (its “dignity”) is the result of biological evolution and of human history. By active gestures and language, we produce sense within the human communicating community; we delimit and qualify phenomena, we co-construct objects of knowledge and objectivity. Today’s use of discrete state (digital) machines both as mathematical models and as a paradigm in science and humanities sets peculiar biases to knowledge construction. Their networks for elaborating information provide fantastic tools for human activities, but also an image of the world. The confusion between “elaboration of information” and “production of sense” is affecting our humanity and ways of knowing. The strong dualism of computing devices (software vs. hardware) blurs the radical materiality and the physical singularity of life. The related distortion of knowledge is also grounded on the abuse of pre-scientific or common-sense notions from information and programming theories in biology, with some dramatic consequences also for our health, in particular in cancer analysis and prevention.

References:

F. Bailly, G. Longo, Mathematics and the Natural Sciences. The Physical Singularity of Life, Imperial
College Press, London, 2011.(Introduction:  http://www.di.ens.fr/users/longo/files/BaLoSingBook/english-introduction.pdf  )

G. Longo. The Biological Consequences of the Computational World: Mathematical Reflections on Cancer Biology.  In Print   See   http://www.di.ens.fr/users/longo/download.html   for this and more.

 

Bio

Giuseppe Longo is Directeur de Recherche (DRE) CNRS at Centre Interdisciplinaire Cavaillès, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris andAdjunct Professor, Department of Integrative Physiology and Pathobiology, Tufts University, Boston. He is a former Professor of Mathematical Logic and, later, of Computer Science at the University of Pisa. In the '80s, he spent 3 years in the USA (U.C.Berkeley, M.I.T., Carnegie Mellon) as researcher and Visiting Professor. GL isfounder and former director (1990-2015) of Mathematical Structures in Computer Science, a Cambridge U.P. journal. Since the late '90s, he extended his research interests to the Epistemology of Mathematics and Theoretical Biology. He (co-)authored more than 100 papers and three books: with A. Asperti, on Categories, Types and Structures (M.I.T. Press, 1991); with F. Bailly, Mathematics and the natural sciences: The Physical Singularity of Life(Hermann, Paris, 2006; Imperial College Press, London, 2011); with M. Montévil, Perspectives on Organisms: Biological Time, Symmetries and Singularities (Springer, Berlin, 2014). With A.Soto and D. Noble, Longo edited (and co-authored six papers) of a 2016 special issue of Prog Biophys Mol Biol, From the century of the genome to the century of the organism: New theoretical approaches. He directs a research project at IEA-Nantes (2014-20) on the concept of law, in human and natural sciences.

Web: http://www.di.ens.fr/users/longo/


ANADYOMENE AND THE BEAUTY OF THE TROUBLESOME: GNOMONICS OF SPECTRALITY
AS THE ART OF EMBRACING OBSTACLES

Prof. Dr. Elias Zafiris | mathematics | Athens University

 

Abstract

The main thematics concerns the notion of information as “anadyomene” in the context of the natural communication model. Information is theorized from a non-statistical and not set- theoretic viewpoint, as pertaining to the capacity of forming distinguishable spectral differences within intrinsically and objectively foamy surroundings, laden by the presence of obstacles and obstructions of any possible nature. We examine particular exemplifying cases in relation to the algebraic, geometric, topological and harmonic domain. In all these cases, information emerges as “anadyomene” from another level of “hypostasis” via an obstacle- circulation metaphorical process guided by a “gnomon”. In turn, this unifying characteristic underlies a specific type of weaving of the fabric of “chronos” in modular relation to the considered “topoi”. 

Bio

Elias Zafiris holds an M.Sc. (Distinction) in “quantum fields and fundamental forces” and a Ph.D. in “theoretical and mathematical physics”, both from Imperial College at the University of London. He has published papers on category-theoretic methods in quantum physics and complex systems theories, modern differential geometry and topology, and many other topics in the foundations of physics and mathematics. He is also the author of two books on these subjects.

He is a research professor in theoretical and mathematical physics at the Institute of Mathematics at the University of Athens, and is currently a visiting professor in the Department of Logic, Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest.

 


ARCHITECTURAL MATHESIS
Prof. Dr. Frédéric Migayrou | architecture theory
The Bartlett School of Architecture | Centre Pompidou

Abstract


Architecture is historically bound to Mathematics as a discipline working on space (geometry) and numbers (algebra).  If it is possible to organize a history of architecture linked to the evolution of geometry from Euclidian, to differential then algebraic geometry, the consequences of a full algebrisation, the generalisation of the computational and the increasing recourse to generic simulation tools impose a new approach to the current interaction of architecture and mathematics. The influence of structuralism and the logical sources of phenomenology constitute a common ground to define a short history of computational architecture interacting with questions relative to the foundations of mathematics. To surpass the debates between formalism, realism and intuitionism, the questions of “Naturalisation”, of the Theory of Categories (Topos, Morphism...) or the “Ontology of the Number” remain as keys to understand possible perspectives on digital architecture.

Bio

Chair Professor, Bartlett School of Architecture, University College, London (U.C.L). Deputy Director, National Museum of Modern Art, Centre Pompidou, Paris. Curator and Publisher of books and catalogues on Art & Architecture (Steven Holl, Diller & Scofidio, Morphosis, De Stijl, Claude Parent, Bernard Tschumi, Frank Gehry, Dominique Perrault, Le Corbusier, Marcel Duchamp, Jeff Wall, Japan-Ness (History of Japanese Architecture, 1945-2015), La Tendenza (Italian Architecture, 1965-1985).   Regarding Digital Architecture: Co-Founder of Archilab (Annual Exhibition on Experimental Architecture, 1999-2004), Curator of Non Standard Architecture (Pompidou Center, 2003) and Co-Curator of Naturalising Architecture (2014). Founder of the Center for Digital Architecture B-Pro (Bartlett Prospective). In preparation: Coding the World (Pompidou Center, 2018)

 


A TREATISE ON DIGITAL ARCHITECTURE
Prof. Dr. Ludger Hovestadt | architecture and information science ETH Zürich, CAAD

 

Abstract:

This paper argues that we left the order of "absolute time" around 1900 and entered a new world of "life". Quite comparable to the Renaissance, which left the order of "absolute space and entered the new world of "time". In fact, we are currently experiencing a dramatic erosion of sense and values of our old logical order of time. With this, we can learn from the Renaissance that we should follow the humanist way, trust our intellect, get "literate" in the digital, and reevaluate our cultural heritage. 

This, not a certain performativity, is presented in this talk as digital architecture today (which, surprisingly but consequently, did not start recently, but 120 years ago). 
 


Bio

Since 2000 Ludger Hovestadt is Professor for Computer Aided Architectural Design at the ETH Zürich, Switzerland, and is directing a permanent research group of 16 PhD students. His interest is in artificial intelligence and not in computer graphics. He founded several companies in the fields of smart geometry, building intelligence, building information models and the internet of things.  Since 2008 his focus shifted from applications to the principles of computing in architecture. In 2010 he cofounded the Laboratory for Applied Virtuality with Vera Bühlmann, which edits the applied virtuality book series (Birkhäuser, since 2010). He has published several books on architecture, computing, philosophy, and mathematics. 

View Event →
Dec
4
to Dec 10

DEC 4-10 2017 // Upcoming: 6th Workshop on DIGITAL GNOMONICS

Vienna, Austria, December 4-10th 2017

With these workshops we want to engage with the vibrant and intriguing questions of architecture in the world of data. During these weeks of intensive exchange, we will immerse ourselves into abstract thinking, coding as literacy, and digital citizenship in architecture. Do you think that digital architecture has reached a point of saturation? Are you interested in stepping beyond the current discourses around digitality today? We believe that digital technologies, behaviours and environments have a far greater potential than their current articulations suggest. Let us think of coding as a new literacy!

The course is aimed at creative open-minded people who would like to challenge traditional architectural education. Current students, bachelors, masters and PhDs, recent graduates, architects, designers, career changers and individuals interested in technology and culture at large are all welcome. The course requires no specialised knowledge or background beyond a serious interest in the topic. 

Get in touch if you are interested!

Co-organized by:

Ludger Hovestadt, architect and computer scientist, professor for CAAD at ETH Zurich.
Vera Bühlmann, philosopher and media theorist, professor for architectural theory at TU Vienna.
Elias Zafiris, quantum physicist and mathematician, professor at Eötvös University, Budapest.

View Event →
NOV 30 2017 // Stu­die­ren­den­tag im Az W
Nov
30
3:00 PM15:00

NOV 30 2017 // Stu­die­ren­den­tag im Az W

11-727x1024.jpg

Im Rahmen des Seminars Architekturtheorie bei Kristian Faschingeder haben sich 12 Studierende auf die Herbstausstellung „Form folgt Paragraph“ im Architekturzentrum Wien vorbereitet und unterschiedliche Ausstellungspositionen vertiefend analysiert. Anlässlich des Studierendentages werden sie anhand von kurzen Impulsstatements durch die Ausstellung führen. 

15:00 Anna Königshofer „Architektur außerhalb der Spielregeln“
15:30 Manuel Kainz „Ungeschriebene Gesetze in der Architektur“
16:00 Adam Gajdoš “What would Aldo van Eyck do?”
16:30 Daniel Heidegger „Einfluss des Normenüberschusses auf die Qualität unserer gebauten Umwelt“
17:00 Ricarda Kohler „Ästhetik der Regelwerke”
17:30 Max Felber „Regeln der Schönheit in der Architektur“
18:00 Marvin Lemmy Gugler „Die Baukunst der Normen“
18:30 Tsvetoslava Stamenova „Sind strengere Normen im Wohnbau mit Bezug auf Energieeffizienz sinnvoll?“

 

19:00 Party mit DJ Line und Dancefloor im Podium des Az W
in Kooperation mit der fachschaft:architektur (www.fachschaftarchitektur.at)

Wir freuen uns auf alle Architekturfreund*innen.

View Event →
Nov
2
8:00 PM20:00

Performance Art Piece – Alien Introspection at Art Festival VERMÖGEN

Contributors

Laboria Cuboniks: Diann Bauer, Katrina Burch, Helen Hester, Patricia Reed

H.A.U.S.: Christoph Hubatschke, Christoph Müller, Oliver Schürer.

Coding: Stephanie Gross, Brigitte Krenn, Friedrich Neubarth. Interaction Scripting: Christian Fiedler, Patrick Lechner. Performance: Tanja Brandmayer. Joy Mariama Smith (vocal work). Robert Pravda (rotational speaker).

Film / live-broadcast: Michael Loizenbauer

 

November 3 6pm(in english)

Seminar day / free admission

Program online October 16 (RSVP)

with: Mark Coeckelbergh, Clara Haider, Helen Hester, Janina Loh, Kristian Lukic, Christoph Müller, Oliver Schürer, Robert Trappl, Christiana Tsiourti, Marlies Wirth.

View Event →
Nov
1
4:00 PM16:00

Gregg Lambert: Reflections on a Silurian Lake

Prof. Gregg Lambert
Syracuse University, New York USA, The Humanities Center, Founding Director 2008-2014

Wednesday, November 1st 2017
4 - 6 pm, ATTP Main Space 
followed by snacks and drinks

Reflections on a Silurian Lake: Lucretius, Meillassoux, and Lyotard

At this point, let us return a few millennia to our Epoch of his majesty the Ego called the Anthropocene, which many humanists have taken up as a critical perspective in order to “de-center” the anthropocentric presence of the Subject in its opening to the material universe. This de-centering operation usually involves a supplanting of the Subject by absence, which often assumes the form of a speculative thesis involving time on a planetary or even paleontological scale, as in the case of Quentin Meillassoux’s arche-fossil (Meillassoux, After Finitude, 2008). Thus, absence is no longer determined in relation to “consciousness of,” as in phenomenology, but rather in terms of the “not yet, or the no longer” of the Subject.

The question that concerns us is "what," or rather, “where is time,” or more specifically, whether the theme of time and temporality could even be possible.

To illustrate this perspective, rather than turning to Meillassoux´s duration of an ancestral past demonstrated in the facticity of the arche-fossil, I will return to Lyotard, who in the mid-1980’s in a series of reflections on the inhuman (Lyotard, The Inhuman: Reflections on Time, 1991), speculated on the absence that occurs 4.5 billion years in the future – when the sun has exploded and the earth and all of its inhabitants no longer exist. 

 

Gregg Lambert

After completing his Ph.D, under the direction of late French philosopher Jacques Derrida, Professor Lambert joined the Department of English at Syracuse University in 1996, and was later appointed to Full Professor and Chair of English in 2005. In 2008, he was appointed as the Founding Director of the Humanities Center, where he currently holds a distinguished research appointment as Dean’s Professor of Humanities in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Since 2008, Professor Lambert has also served as Principal Investigator and Director of the Central New York Humanities Corridor, a regional collaborative research network between Syracuse University, Cornell University, the University of Rochester, and the NY6 Liberal Arts Consortium which has been generously supported by three consecutive awards from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

In addition to the Humanities Corridor, he has also directed several other major multi-institutional research and interdisciplinary initiatives, including the Society for the Study of Biopolitical Futures (with Cary Wolfe, Rice University), the Trans-Disciplinary Media Studio (with SU School of Architecture) and The Perpetual Peace Project, a multi-lateral curatorial initiative partnered with Slought Foundation (Philadelphia), the European Union National Institutes of Culture, the International Peace Institute, and the United Nations University, Utrecht University Centre for Humanities, and the Treaty of Utrecht Foundation (the Netherlands). In 2013, he was elected as a member of the International Advisory Board of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes.

Author of eleven books, critical editions, and more than a hundred articles in journals and critical editions, Professor Lambert is internationally renowned for his scholarly writings on critical  theory, philosophy, the role of the Humanities in the contemporary university, and; especially for his work on the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Derrida. 

 

Recent Publications:
Return Statements (Edinburgh University Press, 2016)
Philosophy After Friendship (University of Minnesota Press, 2017)

View Event →
Oct
9
4:30 PM16:30

H.A.U.S. - Humanoids in Architecture and Urban Spaces blog is out

The interdisciplinary research group “Architecture Humanoids Project” is researching issues of humanoid technology in human lifeworlds with a focus on architecture and urbanism. By correlating approaches of architectural theory, philosophy and computer engineering, the project is conducting architectural theory and philosophy driven experiments with Aldebarans Pepper, Romeo and some Naos.

Visit the new Blog here: h-a-u-s.org/

View Event →
Oct
2
3:00 PM15:00

All Lectures of the ETHICS OF CODING / TOWARDS A QUANTUM LITERACY Conference are online!

 

DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP & THE ACQUISITION OF PRIVACY

Ludger Hovestadt, ETH Zürich | Chair for Computer Aided Architectural Design 

Marcel Alexander Niggli, University Fribourg | Chair for Criminal Law, Criminology and Philosophy of Law 

 

WAYS OF MAKING USE OF DATA:  RECORDING, SOURCING, STORING, DEALING WITH DATA –  CODING AS WRITING? AS TRADING? AS GIVING AN ACCOUNT? AS BEARING WITNESS?

Elie Ayache, Ludger Hovestadt, Marcel Alexander Niggli, Philippe Morel, 

Antoinette Rouvroy, Anne-Françoise Schmid, Moderation: Vera Bühlmann

 

THE ETHICS OF CODING: THE HUMAN ALGORITHMIC CONDITION

Project Introduction: Felicity Colman, Kingston University London | Director of Research Programmes, Professor of Film and Media Arts

 

MONEY AS THE CURRENCY OF THOUGHT

Philippe Morel, ENSA Paris-Malaquais | Ass. Professor of Architecture, Co-founder Digital Knowledge Department

PRICE WRITING

Elie Ayache, ITO 33 Paris, products and services to the financial industry | Co-founder & CEO 

GENERICITY, KNOWLEDGE, TIME

Anne-Françoise Schmid, INSA Lyon | Ass. Prof. of Epistemology and Philosophy

View Event →
New BOOK: A Genius Planet (Birkhäuser, Basel 2017)
Aug
16
5:30 PM17:30

New BOOK: A Genius Planet (Birkhäuser, Basel 2017)

A GENIUS PLANET — ENERGY: FROM SCARCITY TO ABUNDANCE, A RADICAL PATHWAY

BY LUDGER HOVESTADT, VERA BÜHLMANN, SEBASTIAN MICHAEL (Birkhäuser, Basel 2017)

https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/466971

Imagine a world where the power is always on, where there is not just enough energy, but an abundance of it. Such a world is no Utopia, it is a possible reality. Using indefinitely available sources of energy – especially photovoltaic solar, in combination with others – and networking this energy, much in the way that we have networked information, we can get beyond our current energy ‘crisis’ and resolve it. The world we then find ourselves in is not a world without problems – we will face new challenges on the way – but in terms of energy it is a world of plenty. Rooted in sound theory and based on technology that is available now, A Genius Planet offers an accessible but detailed and insightful perspective on how we can free ourselves from our dependency on natural resources and generate, trade, and use energy in ways that open up the genuine potential that we have at our disposal today.

From the Foreword:

"This book has a simple and optimistic message: energy isn’t a resource, energy is clean, and energy isn’t scarce, in fact the opposite, it is abundant! Because now, with information technology, energy has become what we might call an ‘intellectual wealth’ that can be captured, stored, distributed – ‘cycled’, so to speak – by electronic coding. And as there are no limits in principle to how much ‘energy cycling’ is possible, energy itself loses the limitations we’re used to associate with it.

It is not, at first, entirely obvious or perhaps intuitive to think of energy as an ‘intellectual wealth’ that can be ‘cycled’, and so the book explains in detail how and why this is so, and it makes a compelling case for embracing this extremely relevant reality: we have more than enough energy. For the foreseeable future, and beyond. We can relax. " 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOREWORD 6

I  GENIUS 15 I THE ALTERED STATE 18 — II SEIZING THE MOMENT 19

II  THE TASk IN HAND 21 I THE RED HERRING: SUSTAINABILITY 23 — II A CATEGORICAL LEAP 24 — III THE CURRENT CONTEXT 25 — IV WHO WE ARE 27 — V WHERE WE’RE COMING FROM... 29 — VI ... AND WHERE WE WANT TO GO 37 — VII A PATHWAY OPEN TO EVERYONE 40 — VIII THE ‘POTENTIALITY Of APPLICATIONS’ 42 — IX THE ‘RESOURCE’ THAT MULTIPLIES FOREVER 44 — X THE LEVELLER: DEMOCRACY IN THE NETWORK 45

III  ENERGY IS NOT THE PROBLEM 49 I DEALING WITH OBSTACLES ON THE WAY 53 — II PREMISE PART 1: THE ISSUE IS LOGISTICS 54 — III PREMISE PART 2: WE HAVE ENERGY THAT GETS CHEAPER THE MORE Of IT WE USE 55 — IV PREMISE PART 3: THE KEY IS NETWORKED ELECTRICITY 59 — V CAN DO VS HAVE TO 61 — VI FORMULATING A DIFFERENT KIND Of QUESTION 63 — VII THE VISION: ‘ALWAYS ON’ POWER 66 — VIII OUR 135-YEAR LAG 66 — IX ABUNDANCE 68 — X THE FEAR Of GOD 69 — XI MORE IS MORE 71

IV  A QUICK REFRESHER ON ELECTRICITY 77 I THE DYNAMO/GENERATOR 83 — II AC/DC 84 — III THE TRANSFORMER 85 — IV WHERE IT ALL COMES FROM 87 — V WHERE MUCH OF IT COULD BE COMING FROM INSTEAD 88

V THE NETWORK: SHARING POWER 91 IPOWER SHIFTS Of A DIFFERENT KIND 93—II THE NETWORK EFFECT AND ENERGY 95 — III LIFE AFTER FOSSILS 97 — IV ’INTELLIGENT ENERGY’ 99 — V NETWORK TERMINOLOGY 101 — VI OUR FRIEND THE ELECTRON 102 — VII THE ENERGY NETWORK: AN ‘INTERNET OF THINGS’ 104 — VIII WHAT WE USE ENERGY FOR 108

VI  MAKING IT HAPPEN: A TURNKEY TECHNOLOGY 111 I GENESIS OF AN INVENTION 114 — II THE MISSING LINK 117 — III HOW IT WORKS 119 — IV THE DIGITALSTROM CHIP 123 — V APPLICATIONS 125 — VI NETWORK SOLIDARITY 127 — VII TRADING ELECTRICITY 131 — VIII SMART METERS 133 — IX A TYPICAL INSTALLATION 134

VII  THREE CASE STUDIES 137 I SWITZERLAND 138 — II INDIA 142 — III ETHIOPIA 146

VIII THE BIGGER PICTURE 151 I THE YOGHURT PHENOMENON 152 — II THE APPLICATION PRINCIPLE FORETOLD 156 — III CULTIVATING OUR ENERGY EXPERIENCE 158 — IV PRINTED ENERGY: PHOTOVOLTAICS 158 — V THE POWER OF EXPONENTIAL GROWTH 163 — VI ENERGY AND ARCHITECTURE 166 — VII THE ROLE Of THERMODYNAMICS 169 — VIII UNTAPPED ENERGY: EXERGY 178 — IX INFINITE SOURCES OF ENERGY 181 — X NUCLEAR 187

IX A PLANET IN CRISIS: INTELLECT TO THE RESCUE 193 I THREE GENERATIONS OF ENERGY 194 — II A PATH OF RATIONAL OPTIMISM 199 — III “THIS IS OF THE DEVIL” – FACING OPPOSITION 204 — IV THE DIFFICULTY OF THE NEW 207 — V LEAPS OF THE IMAGINATION 209 — VI POWER STORIES 211 — VII THINKING ENERGY 213 — VIII OUR EVOLVING TAKE ON ENERGY 215 — IX ABSTRACT ENERGY 216 — X ENERGY AND SYMBOLS 219 — XI NUMBERS AND ELECTRICITY 223 — XII POWER THROUGH THOUGHT 229 — XIII MEDIAL ENERGY 230 — XIV POPULATIONS AND MODELS 232—XV LEARNING TO LOVE UNCERTAINTY 237 — XVI BEYOND TECHNOLOGY 239

X THE OUTLOOK: WHAT NEXT? 243 I AND WHAT ABOUT ME? 246

CONCLUSION 250
APPENDIX 253
REFERENCE 257 

View Event →
New BOOK: Special Edition of MINNESOTA REVIEW on NEW MATERIALIST GENEALOGIES
Aug
16
5:00 PM17:00

New BOOK: Special Edition of MINNESOTA REVIEW on NEW MATERIALIST GENEALOGIES

the minnesota review: New Materialist Genealogies

Guest-edited by Vera Bühlmann, Felicity Colman, Iris van der Tuin
Volume 2017, Number 88, 2017

Access to journal HERE.
Note 'NM Special Focus' is located in middle section. 

http://minnesotareview.dukejournals.org/content/current 

 

Extract from introduction below:

VERA BÜHLMANN, FELICITY COLMAN, AND IRIS VAN DER TUIN
INTRODUCTION TO NEW MATERIALIST GENEALOGIES
NEW MATERIALISMS, NOVEL MENTALITIES, QUANTUM LITERACY

Like the new materialist turn, feminist new materialist scholarship (Haraway 1988; Barad 2007) draws attention to a novel understanding of literacy that incorporates code and is not limited to linguistic registers of grammar, syntax, and semantics (Haraway 1997). At stake is the conception of literacy, whose articulations are capable of organizing the generative potential/contingency of the expressions and forms of conceptions as real things.

From the materialist investigations that coalesced through and in the merger of the sciences with humanities research (notably in Bergson 2004; Haraway 1988, 1991, 1997; Barad 2007; Lévy-Leblond 1976, 1999; Plotnitsky 2006, 2009), new materialist investigations join as part of a paradigmatic shift that we witnessed occurring across the pedagogic landscape of the early twenty-first century in environmental humanities, science, and technology studies as well as across the humanities and in the sciences (see Dolphijn and van der Tuin 2012). In the humanities, some of these shifts are articulated under the concepts explored in postcapitalist, posthumanist, and postcolonial positions. In the sciences, these new fields that opened in the twentieth century manifest, transversally rather than disciplinarily, the roles that informatics, systems theory, and cybernetics have de facto come to play in all fields (Wiener 1948; Bateson 1972; Whitehead 2011; Margulis and Sagan 2008; Hayles 2012). These investigations all result in a change in the narratives concerning knowledge forms, their production, and their meaning (Floridi 2015; Lyotard [1979] 1984; Serres 1969–80; Terranova 2004).

Through our study of new materialist research, what we have come to discern is that this new materialist literacy has in part come about as part of a consideration of the methods that feature in the twentieth century in “quantum-thinking.” The epistemological as well as the ontological status of these methods in their practice—that is, in their current actualization—have largely unsettled the pedagogical landscape as a whole, and they are profoundly disturbing from the
point of view of both objectivist and subjectivist philosophy. In effect, there are numerous attempts at disentangling—often in orthodox fashion—the disturbing co-incidence of information and energy, of code and matter, that we witness in electro-technics and informatics.

Continue reading HERE

CONTENTS

Monika Rogowska-Stangret: Corpor(e)al Cartographies of New MaterialismMeeting the Elsewhere Halfway

Whitney Stark: Assembled BodiesReconfiguring Quantum Identities

Marie-Luise Angerer: Moving Forces

Marc Kosciejew: A Material-Documentary LiteracyDocuments, Practices, and the Materialization of Information

Iris van der Tuin: Signals FallingReading Woolf and Guattari Diffractively for a New Materialist Epistemology

Elizabeth de Freitas: Nonhuman Findings from the Laboratory of Speculative Sociology

Helen Palmer: Stein Does Proteus at Sunset on Blackpool Promenade

Helen Palmer: RAWR

Helen Palmer: Jellyfish

Helen Palmer: Break

REVIEWS

Stanimir Panayotov: Speculum of the Pruning-Scissors(on Katerina Kolozova and Eileen A. Joy, eds., After the “Speculative Turn”: Realism, Philosophy, and Feminism)

Nathalie Blanc: The Strange Agencies and the Seaside(on Stacy Alaimo, Exposed: Environmental Politics and Pleasures in Posthuman Times)

-------------------------------

Please refer also to: http://newmaterialism.eu

COST Action IS1307 New Materialism: Networking European Scholarship on 'How Matter Comes to Matter'.

 

 

 

  

 

View Event →
Jul
13
4:00 PM16:00

Guest Lecture: "Food is the New Internet – ?"

Am Donnerstag 13. Juli 2017, 4 pm at ATTP

Transformative Technologien in der Lebensmittelproduktion
Prozesse und Produkte für die Lebensmittelmärkte in der neuen Gegenwart

. Organisationsentwicklung als Voraussetzung für technologische Innovation
. Mehr vom Guten durch kontinuierliche Prozesstechnik und Direktverarbeitung auf dem Feld
. Transparenz in der Wertschöpfungskette damit Vertrauen entstehen kann
. Transformative Führung zwischen einer anderen und der besten Praxis

Prof. Dr. Tilo Hühn

ZHAW Life Sciences und Facility Management, Wädenschwil Schweiz
https://www.zhaw.ch/de/ueber-uns/person/htil/
 

Dozent im Studiengang Lebensmitteltechnologie:
Lehrveranstaltungen: Getränke (Modulleitung), Getränkeherstellung, Getränkerohstoffe,
Lebensmittelmarketing, Marketingplanspiel, Personalführung
 

Dozent im Masterstudiengang Life Sciences:
Vertiefung Food & Beverage Innovation
Lehrveranstaltungen: Innovation (Modulleitung), Product and Process Design, Mentoring Program

http://www.beverages.ch

View Event →
Panel Discussion: CODE AND MATERIALITY
May
18
6:00 PM18:00

Panel Discussion: CODE AND MATERIALITY

  • ehemaliges k. und k. Post- und Telegraphenamt (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Panel-Discussion (Part of this years “Entwerfenausstellung” - organised by the Faculty of Architecture and Planning, TU Wien)

    Start: 18:00 / Zollergasse 31, 1070 Wien

    Moderation: Vera Bühlmann (ATTP, TU Wien)

    Panelists: Kristina Schinegger (SOMA), Christoph Müller, Oliver Schürer (ATTP, TU Wien)

View Event →
May
3
to May 4

May 3/4 2017 EU Horizon 2020 ETHICS OF CODING

Towards a Quantum Literacy: Spectral Sovereignty, Citizenship, and Personhood in a Digital World

May 3-4 2017

EoC seminar “Ethical Coding” at Technical University Vienna, Department for Architectural Theory and Philosophy of Technics ATTP

May 3 2017     8:00 pm – 22:00 pm  Public Evening Lecture (Kuppelsaal TU Vienna, Main Building)

May 4 2017     9:30am – 7:00 pm Seminar  (if you are interested to join please mail to vera.buehlmann@tuwien.ac.at) at the ATTP Seminar Space, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 7, Hof, Stiege 2, floor 1. 

Ethics of Coding: A Report on the Algorithmic Condition            
Project 732407 funded under H2020-EU.2.1.1. - INDUSTRIAL LEADERSHIP - Leadership in enabling and industrial technologies - Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/207025_en.html

 

Program

May 3rd 2017

7:30 pm                 Welcome  Apero, Kuppelsaal TU Wien

8:00- 8:30 pm     
“Quantum Literacy and the Speed of Thought”, introduction by Vera Bühlmann, TU Vienna

8:30-9:30 pm      
“Digital Citizenship and the Acquisition of Privacy” Ludger Hovestadt (ETH Zurich, Chair for CAAD ITA) & Marcel Alexander Niggli (University Fribourg, Law and Philosophy)

9:30- 10:30pm     
“Ways of making use of Data: Recording, Sourcing, Storing, Dealing with data – coding as writing? As trading? As giving an account? As bearing witness?
roundtable with Marcel Alexander Niggli, Ludger Hovestadt, Elie Ayache, Antoinette Rouvroy, Philippe Morel, Anne-Françoise Schmid. Moderation by Vera Bühlmann

May 4th 2017

9:15-9:45 am         Coffee & Croissants welcome   

9:45 -10:00am     
Ethics of Coding: Human Algorithmic Condition, the project introduction by Felicity Colman, Kingston University, London

10:00 – 11:00 am
“How to ´address´ data?” Antoinette Rouvroy, Université de Namur / Centre de Recherche Information, Droit et Société (CRIDS)

11:00 – 12:00 am
“Money as the Currency of Thought”, Philippe Morel, Digital Knowledge Center, ENSA Paris-Malaquais

12:00-2:00 pm     Lunch

2:00-3:00 pm      
“Price Writing”, Elie Ayache, ITO33 Paris

3:00-4:00 pm      
“Genericness, Knowledge, Time” Anne-Francoise Schmid, Associate professor of epistemology and philosophy, INSA de Lyon

4:00-4:30 pm       Coffee Break

4:30-5:30 pm      
Discussion, Ethics of Coding Project Team, all presenters, audience.

View Event →
LIXIL International Student Competition Finale / RADIANT FIELD
Apr
19
8:30 AM08:30

LIXIL International Student Competition Finale / RADIANT FIELD

  • Diamond Room (South), Keidanren Kaikan 4F (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

We are very excited and honored to be invited to the Open Final Screening and to be one of the top three universities that have passed the preliminary selection out of the twelve invitational universities from ten countries.

The final screening in Tokyo will take place on April 19, 2017 (Wed) 8:30~12:30 (CET, GMT+2).

The link to the live stream is here: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/PSWRaAHQSWH

A+U (Engl./Jap. architecture and urbanism journal) is hosting the live stream: https://twitter.com/aupublishing

Our team is comprised of architecture students Ivan Matas, Lena Kohlmayr, Patrick Aprent, Raphaela Schiefersteiner, Dominik Fill and instructors Prof. Vera Bühlmann, Benjamin Reynolds and Valle Medina.

Our very special external advisors are Prof. Ludger Hovestadt (Chair of Computer Architecture Aided Design at ETH Zurich) and Matthew Cowan (artist).

View Event →